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Episode 277: Mariel Loveland

Mariel Loveland of Best Ex (formerly known as Candy Hearts) came by Going Off Track to discuss her contemptuous relationship... Read on.
Mariel Loveland of Best Ex (formerly known as Candy Hearts) came by Going Off Track to discuss her contemptuous relationship with online trolls, the emotional rollercoaster she endured in Candy Hearts and why she wanted to start a musical project as a way of starting fresh. We also talk about what it’s like to be...  Read on.
Mariel Loveland of Best Ex (formerly known as Candy Hearts) came by Going Off Track to discuss her contemptuous relationship with online trolls, the emotional rollercoaster she endured in Candy Hearts and why she wanted to start a musical project as a way of starting fresh. We also talk about what it's like to be a twin, why the worst pizza she's ever had was in Ohio and why Loveland has a complicated relationship with social media. "There have maybe been one or two tours where this wasn't an issue because I'm a girl," Loveland says at one point. "Whether it's someone sending me pictures I don't want in one of the bands and just stuff like that. I'm very shy and I can't be bros with the people I'm touring with the same way that the guys in my band are; they form these really strong friendships whereas I can't connect on that level because I'm just not the same as them." Hopefully moving forward this won't be as much of an issue for Loveland because she is a truly gifted songwriter whose voice needs to be heard, whether it's via Best Ex or candid interviews like this one. Best Ex on Bandcamp Follow Mariel on Twitter
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Episode 276: Craig Wedren

Shudder To Think frontman Craig Wedren came by Going Off Track to discuss his new solo album “Adult Desire,” composing... Read on.
Shudder To Think frontman Craig Wedren came by Going Off Track to discuss his new solo album “Adult Desire,” composing the music for “Wet Hot American Summer: Ten Years Later” and his live series of Sabbath Sessions which are the perfect soundtrack for dreaming and meditation. We also discuss Shudder To Think’s major-label rollercoaster and...  Read on.
Shudder To Think frontman Craig Wedren came by Going Off Track to discuss his new solo album "Adult Desire," composing the music for "Wet Hot American Summer: Ten Years Later" and his live series of Sabbath Sessions which are the perfect soundtrack for dreaming and meditation. We also discuss Shudder To Think's major-label rollercoaster and what it was like opening for bands like Pearl Jam during their nineties heyday, how Wedren started composing music for films and ended up working on everything from "Anchorman" to "School Of Rock" and what it was like growing up in Cleveland alongside the creator of The State and his longtime collaborator David Wain. "Music needs to be free," Wedren says of how his old art-rock band was able to seamlessly fit in on the Dischord Records roster. "It was always very important—and still is that the music I'm involved in—that the music I was making helped people feel freer and better and more connected to themselves and each other so that was what Shudder To Think became." Listening to those records now, as well as Wedren's subsequent work, that sentiment still rings true. Craig Wedren
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Episode 275: The Movielife

The Movielife vocalist Vinnie Caruana and guitarist Brandon Reilly came by Going Off Track to celebrate their first album in... Read on.
The Movielife vocalist Vinnie Caruana and guitarist Brandon Reilly came by Going Off Track to celebrate their first album in fourteen years, “Cities In Search Of A Heart.” Vinnie also tells a dark trilogy of stories about different ways he learned the hard way that “emo nights” aren’t always conducive to hip-hop and how he...  Read on.
The Movielife vocalist Vinnie Caruana and guitarist Brandon Reilly came by Going Off Track to celebrate their first album in fourteen years, “Cities In Search Of A Heart.” Vinnie also tells a dark trilogy of stories about different ways he learned the hard way that “emo nights” aren’t always conducive to hip-hop and how he managed to alienate both crowd members and organizers in the process. We also discuss the pains of handwriting in the digital era, why Silent Majority never gained a huge following outside of Long Island and our favorite Jawbreaker records. “Even if you did make the best record of all-time that still doesn’t mean that anyone has time for it and they may have the Movielife songs they like and not want to hear more,” Caruana says at one point. “So all we could do is just make a killer record and hope that there are some people that it moves and it gets under their skin.” The Movielife Become a Patron of Going Off Track Photo by Shervin Lainez
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Episode 274: Simon Doom

Simon O’Connor came by Going Off Track to discuss his solo project Simon Doom, how a crust punk from NYC... Read on.
Simon O’Connor came by Going Off Track to discuss his solo project Simon Doom, how a crust punk from NYC ended up at Wesleyan University and the time he got kicked out of the New York Stock Exchange. He also discusses his brief career as the “mayor of lemonade” at Yankee stadium, the major-label rollercoaster,...  Read on.
Simon O’Connor came by Going Off Track to discuss his solo project Simon Doom, how a crust punk from NYC ended up at Wesleyan University and the time he got kicked out of the New York Stock Exchange. He also discusses his brief career as the “mayor of lemonade” at Yankee stadium, the major-label rollercoaster, his previous acts Amazing Baby and Kuroma and how he ended up playing bass in his not-so-obscure college band once again. “MGMT is a lot of fun and I get to be with my best friends and tour but they also know my heart is in Simon Doom,” he explains. “I play in MGMT but it isn’t my band and I think they allow room for it in a good way.” (Hey, as far as day jobs, go playing huge festivals sure beats cutting lemons.) We also discuss why Tom Scharpling’s support helped legitimize Simon Doom to Simon himself, his experience going to guitar camp as a teenager and the two Jim Carrolls in his life.
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