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Episode 245: Greg Graffin

Bad Religion frontman and Ph.D Greg Graffin came by Going Off Track to discuss his latest book Population Wars: A... Read on.
Bad Religion frontman and Ph.D Greg Graffin came by Going Off Track to discuss his latest book Population Wars: A New Perspective On Competition And Coexistence, his new Americana-inspired album Millport which he made alongside members of Social Distortion and how he’s managed to balance his academic pursuits with being the frontman of one of...  Read on.
Bad Religion frontman and Ph.D Greg Graffin came by Going Off Track to discuss his latest book Population Wars: A New Perspective On Competition And Coexistence, his new Americana-inspired album Millport which he made alongside members of Social Distortion and how he's managed to balance his academic pursuits with being the frontman of one of the most legendary punk acts of all-time. He teases a future novel of speculative fiction that has been ruminating in his brain, how he feels like Bad Religion's new drummer Jamie Miller reinvigorated the band and how you keep a punk rock act going strong for over thirty years. “If you're doing something that's good for the environment it's got to be internally satisfying,” he explains when asked how he stays hopeful while so many people freely denigrate the planet. “I think one of the chapters in Population Wars starts off by saying, 'My hope for humanity is often times squashed by my observation by my fellow man.' If you drive your desire to recycle is based on the hope that everyone is going to get on board you're really setting yourself up for a big letdown.” We could all learn a lot from Doctor Graffin.
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Episode 244: Travis Shettel

Piebald frontman Travis Shettel came by Going Off Track for a “lost in the archives” episode that sees him talking... Read on.
Piebald frontman Travis Shettel came by Going Off Track for a “lost in the archives” episode that sees him talking about the indie rock band’s long-awaited reunion, the Boston hardcore scene that helped raise his ban d and what it’s like working at a trendy bar in Los Angeles without killing anyone. We also discuss...  Read on.
Piebald frontman Travis Shettel came by Going Off Track for a "lost in the archives" episode that sees him talking about the indie rock band's long-awaited reunion, the Boston hardcore scene that helped raise his ban d and what it's like working at a trendy bar in Los Angeles without killing anyone. We also discuss the insular nature of Piebald's dynamic, what it was like spending his twenties on tour and why the band never became a mainstream act despite the fact that they had a commercially viable sound. "I wouldn't change it all, it was an experience that so few people get to have and I know I'm lucky to have it" Shettel reminisces at one point. "I know everyone has different life experiences and being in Piebald was my twenties; that's when we would get in the van and just and drive and play and it seemed like what other life could there be? Some office job or something? I don't think so." Take it from Jonah, though they only tour intermittently these days, Piebald are at the top of their game. Also check out Travis' other musical projects listed below. Piebald The Past Haunts Buy a song from Travis via Downwrite
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Episode 243: Death Spells

Death Spells aka Frank Iero (My Chemical Romance) and James Dewees (The Get Up Kids, Reggie And The Full Effect)... Read on.
Death Spells aka Frank Iero (My Chemical Romance) and James Dewees (The Get Up Kids, Reggie And The Full Effect) came by Going Off Track to discuss their musical collaboration Death Spells. Along the way we also discuss emo night/nostalgia, the time the duo got sushi with RZA and what it was like composing music...  Read on.
Death Spells aka Frank Iero (My Chemical Romance) and James Dewees (The Get Up Kids, Reggie And The Full Effect) came by Going Off Track to discuss their musical collaboration Death Spells. Along the way we also discuss emo night/nostalgia, the time the duo got sushi with RZA and what it was like composing music for his film "The Man With The Iron Fists." (Even if both of their names were misspelled in the credits.) We also talk with Dewees about what it's like being a 40 year old that's still playing music and trying to be an adult, hear why Iero doesn't take his social media presence too seriously despite the fact that he has over 600 thousand impassioned followers and the fact that fans are still discovering Death Spells as well as their various other projects including A New Found Glory, Coalesce, Leathermouth and more. "I got into music in a very organic way through friends' siblings and getting mixtapes from bands that I didn't have the chance to see live and now that's happening again with bands that I've been in and it feels surreal and at the same really nice that the art is still living and breathing and growing," Iero explains, adding that it's strange to be both a current artist and a "classic" one. Hopefully we can all age as gracefully as these two extremely prolific musicians. Photo: Ivan Balashov
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Episode 242: Jimmy LaValle

Jimmy LaValle of The Album Leaf, Tristeza and The Locust came by Going Off Track to discuss his incredibly prolific... Read on.
Jimmy LaValle of The Album Leaf, Tristeza and The Locust came by Going Off Track to discuss his incredibly prolific and diverse musical career. We also talk about how he become the first band to sign to both Sub Pop and Relapse, the way he reconciles screaming with Crimson Curse to making ambient soundscapes in...  Read on.
Jimmy LaValle of The Album Leaf, Tristeza and The Locust came by Going Off Track to discuss his incredibly prolific and diverse musical career. We also talk about how he become the first band to sign to both Sub Pop and Relapse, the way he reconciles screaming with Crimson Curse to making ambient soundscapes in The Album Leaf and what it's been like collaborating with everyone from Mark Kozelek to Sigur Ros. We also talk about his role as a reluctant frontman and how he eventually began to embrace it two decades into his career. "I feel a sense of responsibility as a musician who has a voice to be able to say [political] stuff but through twenty years that hasn't really been what I've done, so it's tough," he admits at one point. We also discuss living in Los Angeles, feeling alienated from social media, his new record label and why the Album Leaf is huge is Asia... seriously. The band's first album in six years Between Waves is out now so check that out and then dig into LaValle's expansive back catalog.
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