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Episode 247: Scott Hutchison

Frightened Rabbit frontman Scott Hutchison came by Going Off Track to discuss the how being in a rock band fools... Read on.
Frightened Rabbit frontman Scott Hutchison came by Going Off Track to discuss the how being in a rock band fools you into thinking you’ll be young forever, the way his creative process works and the true nature of happiness. Don’t let the existential anguish fool you though, this is a very lighthearted conversation that also...  Read on.
Frightened Rabbit frontman Scott Hutchison came by Going Off Track to discuss the how being in a rock band fools you into thinking you'll be young forever, the way his creative process works and the true nature of happiness. Don't let the existential anguish fool you though, this is a very lighthearted conversation that also touches on the freeing experience of his solo project Owl John, the interminable nature of conference calls and why the Scottish songwriter went to art school to study illustration but quickly grew disillusioned with the social aspects of academia. "I think a lot of people expect us to be kind of sad live but I think it's actually kind of the opposite," he explains at one point. "That surprise element [of performing live] is kind of arresting in a way. It's refreshing to be a character onstage because it's a break from being yourself; I'm not that effusive on a daily basis but I kind of enjoy that pretending aspect of it." If you've never seen Frightened Rabbit live, trust us, buy tickets the next time they come to your town and there's a good chance they'll be your new favorite band. Case in point: Last year's "Portrait Of A Panic Attack" was Jonah's #1 album of 2016. Frightened Rabbit Owl John Follow Scott on Twitter
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Episode 246: Russian Circles

All three members of Russian Circles: Mike Sullivan, Dave Turncrantz and occasional Going Off Track guest host Brian Cook came... Read on.
All three members of Russian Circles: Mike Sullivan, Dave Turncrantz and occasional Going Off Track guest host Brian Cook came by the podcast while promoting their latest album “Guidance” for a rare group interview with Jonah. Of the course of our conversation we discuss their joke nu metal band called Gypsy Foot, why they don’t...  Read on.
All three members of Russian Circles: Mike Sullivan, Dave Turncrantz and occasional Going Off Track guest host Brian Cook came by the podcast while promoting their latest album "Guidance" for a rare group interview with Jonah. Of the course of our conversation we discuss their joke nu metal band called Gypsy Foot, why they don't have microphones onstage (it has something to do with the fact that both of their video interviews have gotten them banned from magazines) and how as an instrumental band they go about naming their songs. "What one person might take away from the song might be totally different from the next person so normally it's just acknowledgement of people and places that mean something to us as a band and we're grateful for. It's usually positive stuff that resonates with us that doesn't say too much about anything at all," Sullivan explains. We also discuss our mutual love for true crime television, why the band prefer writing music together in person as opposed to working online and Cook's recent experience teaching a bass workshop at Berkelee College Of Music. Oh and if you were wondering if Russian Circles were planning on adding a saxophone player anytime soon, don't count on it. Photo: Paul Blau
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Episode 245: Greg Graffin

Bad Religion frontman and Ph.D Greg Graffin came by Going Off Track to discuss his latest book Population Wars: A... Read on.
Bad Religion frontman and Ph.D Greg Graffin came by Going Off Track to discuss his latest book Population Wars: A New Perspective On Competition And Coexistence, his new Americana-inspired album Millport which he made alongside members of Social Distortion and how he’s managed to balance his academic pursuits with being the frontman of one of...  Read on.
Bad Religion frontman and Ph.D Greg Graffin came by Going Off Track to discuss his latest book Population Wars: A New Perspective On Competition And Coexistence, his new Americana-inspired album Millport which he made alongside members of Social Distortion and how he's managed to balance his academic pursuits with being the frontman of one of the most legendary punk acts of all-time. He teases a future novel of speculative fiction that has been ruminating in his brain, how he feels like Bad Religion's new drummer Jamie Miller reinvigorated the band and how you keep a punk rock act going strong for over thirty years. “If you're doing something that's good for the environment it's got to be internally satisfying,” he explains when asked how he stays hopeful while so many people freely denigrate the planet. “I think one of the chapters in Population Wars starts off by saying, 'My hope for humanity is often times squashed by my observation by my fellow man.' If you drive your desire to recycle is based on the hope that everyone is going to get on board you're really setting yourself up for a big letdown.” We could all learn a lot from Doctor Graffin.
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