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Episode 264: Jon Ronson

Journalist Jon Ronson, author of the best-selling books The Men Who Stare At Goats and The Psychopath Test, came by... Read on.
Journalist Jon Ronson, author of the best-selling books The Men Who Stare At Goats and The Psychopath Test, came by Going Off Track to discuss his friendship with Alex Jones, our collective obsession with public shaming and his new Audible series The Butterfly Effect. Along the way we also discuss the new Netflix film Okja...  Read on.
Journalist Jon Ronson, author of the best-selling books The Men Who Stare At Goats and The Psychopath Test, came by Going Off Track to discuss his friendship with Alex Jones, our collective obsession with public shaming and his new Audible series The Butterfly Effect. Along the way we also discuss the new Netflix film Okja which he co-wrote, why it's so difficult to work in the pornography industry and the saga of Justine Sacco. We also talk about how our political state got so polarized and what we can do to try to come together and try to start moving things in the right direction. "Someone said to me today how can you be a moderate now and I didn't reply because I didn't want to get into a big fight but what I would have said is that extremism is why we're in the mess we're in," Ronson says at one point. "If being a moderate means listening to people and trying to understand each other and trying to be humanistic instead of trenchantly ideological then I think that's the way out of this mess." As difficult as that may seem in practice, it's sound advice and we're thankful to Ronson -- who has appeared on podcasts ranging from The Joe Rogan Experience to WTF With Marc Maron -- for making the time to come in for this enlightening conversation. Jon Ronson's website The Butterfly Effect on Audible
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Episode 263: Spike Slawson

The frontman for Me First And The Gimme Gimmes Spike Slawson came by Going Off Track to discuss how he... Read on.
The frontman for Me First And The Gimme Gimmes Spike Slawson came by Going Off Track to discuss how he want to being an intern at Fat Wreck Chords to starting a band with Fat Mike. Along the way we also talk about the time that the Eagles wouldn’t let the band cover their song,...  Read on.
The frontman for Me First And The Gimme Gimmes Spike Slawson came by Going Off Track to discuss how he want to being an intern at Fat Wreck Chords to starting a band with Fat Mike. Along the way we also talk about the time that the Eagles wouldn't let the band cover their song, why Don Henley hates weed and the time that Paris Hilton was in a music video for their cover of R Kelly's "I Believe I Can Fly." We also discuss the way San Francisco has changed over the years, the time Spike spent playing in The Swingin' Utters and the long history of songwriters writing for other artists. "I look at it as if you have to light a fire onstage you can use your own material or not as long as you're doing it, Spike explains. "People write great music that they could never perform to save their lives all the time because there's a different art to it." If you wanted to learn about the origins and ideology of punk rock's best cover band, this is the podcast for you.

Me First And The Gimme Gimmes

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Episode 262: Lizzy Goodman

Journalist Lizzy Goodman came by Going Off Track to promote her oral history “Meet Me In The Bathroom: Rebirth and... Read on.
Journalist Lizzy Goodman came by Going Off Track to promote her oral history “Meet Me In The Bathroom: Rebirth and Rock and Roll in New York City 2001 – 2011,” a book that took her six years from conception to completion. In this episode we discussed the process of putting together a project that includes...  Read on.
Journalist Lizzy Goodman came by Going Off Track to promote her oral history "Meet Me In The Bathroom: Rebirth and Rock and Roll in New York City 2001 - 2011," a book that took her six years from conception to completion. In this episode we discussed the process of putting together a project that includes 500-plus interviews, how she shaped the narrative and why Carlos D of Interpol was her "white whale" and one of the only people in the scene who opted not to participate in the tome. We also discuss while the Strokes were so influential despite not selling a ton of records, Lizzy's time as what we imagine is the world's coolest second grade teacher and why she still sort of can't believe that she gets to write about bands for a living. "This isn't a book about a particular band or the complete history of the Strokes or the Yeah Yeah Yeahs or LCD Soundsystem," Goodman explains when asked to summarize the book's content. "It's a story about New York and the idea of New York cool during this period of time and how that radiated and shaped culture. These are the characters that shaped that idea so that's why they're relevant." Even if you're not a fan of the aforementioned bands, we promise you'll get sucked into the post-9/11 narrative of this impressive document of a very special time and place. Lizzy, you make us all feel extremely lazy. Buy "Meet Me In The Bathroom" on Amazon Follow Lizzy on Twitter
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